Bruce Chatwin in his London apartment in Eaton Place, which no longer exists; in 1982 the author commissioned John Pawson to renovate it. Photo François Halard.
Domus 901 march 2007, Thinking up against a wall, page 71
"I still have, for example, a hanging of blue and yellow parrot feathers, probabily made for the back wall of a Peruvian Sun Temple and supposed to date from fifth century AD. In 1966, I saw a similar piece in the Dumbarton Oaks collection and, on returning to New York went to see my friend John Wise, who dealt in pre-Columbian art in a room in the Westbury Hotel. (…) ‘I’d give anything for one of those’, I said. ‘Would you?’ he growled. ‘How much money have you got in your pockets?’ ‘I don’t know.’ ‘Empty them, stupid!’ I handed him about $250 - and he handed me back $10 with an equally grumpy ‘I suppose you eat lunch.’"
Bruce Chatwin A place to hang your hat, in Anatomy of Restlessness, New York 1996

Bruce Chatwin in his London apartment in Eaton Place, which no longer exists; in 1982 the author commissioned John Pawson to renovate it. Photo François Halard.

Domus 901 march 2007, Thinking up against a wall, page 71

"I still have, for example, a hanging of blue and yellow parrot feathers, probabily made for the back wall of a Peruvian Sun Temple and supposed to date from fifth century AD. In 1966, I saw a similar piece in the Dumbarton Oaks collection and, on returning to New York went to see my friend John Wise, who dealt in pre-Columbian art in a room in the Westbury Hotel. (…) ‘I’d give anything for one of those’, I said. ‘Would you?’ he growled. ‘How much money have you got in your pockets?’ ‘I don’t know.’ ‘Empty them, stupid!’ I handed him about $250 - and he handed me back $10 with an equally grumpy ‘I suppose you eat lunch.’"

Bruce Chatwin A place to hang your hat, in Anatomy of Restlessness, New York 1996